Lessons Well Learned

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Ikeya
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Lessons Well Learned

Post by Ikeya » 17 Aug 2010 08:35 pm

The mage had seen a great many things over the course the past three decades. Indeed, it was hard not to. Some might have argued that after a lifetime of surprises, war, horror, and wonder, he had been left an empty husk. It was a condition that befell many of the older mages of the Kirin Tor. Eventually one had simply learned and seen so much in their studies and life that life simply became boring and uneventful. Over the course of his lifetime he had witnessed two Horde invasions, the rise of the undead, the discovery of a new continent, a demonic invasion, a war amongst the dragon flights, the fall of the old Horde and a rise of a new Horde, peace made with the new Horde, war declared on the new Horde, Dalaran destroyed, Dalaran rebuilt, two Old Gods rise and fall, the invasion of the Orcish homeland, the corruption, destruction, and subsequent rebirth of the mystical Sunwell, a war against a dragon flight, the liberation of a titan city from corruption, and the fall of the Scourge. That was just a short list, most of happening within the past few years.

So it was not for a want of experience that left the mage speechless at the sight before him. It might have been for a once-firm belief that no one could possibly be so irresponsible as to do something so reckless. Not even an apprentice or initiate would have done something as foolish as what his companion had done. “You made a distillery,”” the mage uttered, “that is powered by arcane magic?”

“Yeah! Isn’t it great, Ike?” Widge answered cheerfully, as if his invention was to revolutionize the world. “Well, to be fair, it was Ringo’s idea. But it took a little bit of gnomish know-how to get it working!”

“A magic powered still,” Ikeya repeated in disbelief. “Didn’t we just get done fighting a war about the proper and responsible uses of magic? And you went and made a magical still.” The dwarf and gnome looked at him quizzically, confused as to what exactly the issue was. “If the Kirin Tor knew of your gross irresponsible handling of your magic…” he trailed off.

“Ah, quit yer complain’!” Ringo grunted in response. “This ain’t reckless. It’s th’ only responsible use o’ magic. Ah swear, ye mages don’t have yer priorities straight.”

“You were given leave to collect your belongings left in Ironforge!” Ikeya all but shouted at the gnome. “Not joy ride through Khaz Modan building magical stills!”

“Oh, that’s right. I meant to stop at Ironforge,” Widge replied offhandedly, having already forgotten the original reason for his return to the Eastern Kingdoms. “But then I stopped by Thelsamar to catch up with Ringo and Beli. It’s been such a long time since the war ended.”

“It’s been one month!” Ikeya sighed as he glared at the still with a hint of malice at its absurdity. “Does it at least taste good?”

“It ain’t as good as real dwarven spirits,” Ringo answered. “But Widge’s contraption can make it faster than even the Thunderbrewers. Less than half o’ the day to make a batch!”

Ikeya stared at the gnome in disbelief. Widge simply waited, confused as to exactly what was wrong this time. The older mages were always complaining about revolutions in technology and telling stories about how back in their day things were better. Widge never understand how life could have been better than it was today. They had lightning generators and nitro boots! Widge couldn’t remember how he managed to live without them. “What?” Widge finally asked. “You think we should streamline and automated the entire process?”

“Done!” Ikeya announced abruptly, spinning on his foot and marching out of the inn.

Ringo and Widge were left looking at one another, neither fully comprehending exactly what imaginary crime Ikeya had thought they committed. It must be a human thing, they decided. Humans always seem prone to freaking and stressing over the tiniest things. They probably needed more to drink. It would probably help them relax.

“Ah jus’ saw Ike stormin’ off. What ye say to get ‘im all riled up?” Belsun asked as he entered the inn.

“I think he thinks that building the Arcano-Still 3000 was a bad idea,” Widge provided.

“What? That’s stupid. Why would that be a bad idea?” Belsun asked.

Note: I hate dwarven accents with such a passion. Dabbled on this while I was away and sort of in response to Ringo's The End Of The Line

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Ringo Flinthammer
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Re: Lessons Well Learned

Post by Ringo Flinthammer » 18 Aug 2010 11:25 am

Oh, sure, magical STRUDEL seems reasonable, but magical BEER is not? That seems like a ridiculous double standard to me. If there were dwarven mages, we wouldn't even be having this conversation.

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Re: Lessons Well Learned

Post by Ikeya » 19 Aug 2010 09:46 pm

There are no dwarven mages because you're all too drunk to not screw up an incantation with your constant slurring.

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Re: Lessons Well Learned

Post by Widge » 10 Sep 2010 05:27 pm

I really don't understand the issue here. We spend years working to hone our arcane abilities in order to make our lives easier. If the Blood Elves can have enchanted brooms keeping their cities clean, surely using magic to make the distillation of alcoholic beverages a more efficient process is no crime! I mean, it helps bring happiness to all! Don't you want Azeroth to be happy, Ike?

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